Until further notice, the University of Arizona, in accordance with the guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, encourages all employees to work remotely. Our offices and rooms in the ENR2 building are closed to the public, but you can reach us, Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 5 PM, at (520) 626-4345 or by email to ienv-environment@arizona.edu.

 

FIND YOUR PERFECT ENVIRONMENT AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

See our themes

Snow on saguaro cactus in desert

Explore the Arizona Institutes for Resilience: Solutions for the Environment and Society (AIR),
a unit under the Office of Research, Innovation & Impact

Learn About Us

Changing the world starts at home. Join us as we chart the course towards creating a more vibrant, sustainable planet.

The environmental issues we face today demand to be met with a combination of discovery and drive. With dozens of environment-related degrees and clubs to choose from, the University of Arizona can set you on a path of real-world, hands-on experience that will prepare you for a future of work that makes an impact.

By connecting some of the world’s leading educators and researchers with students and community members, UArizona Environment is working to confront the unique environmental challenges of the 21st century.

Students

From clubs and committees to courses and degrees, there are myriad ways for students to get involved with environmental issues at UArizona.

Learn more

 

Researchers

Find funding opportunities and help us continue to break new ground in studies related to the environment and sustainability.

Learn more

 

Community

Discover how UArizona is teaming up with organizations across the region to make an impact in fields ranging from renewable energy to wildfire management.

Learn more

 

About AIR

Harnessing the university’s collaborative expertise, the Arizona Institutes for Resilience links knowledge and know-how with real-world issues to help us create a more sustainable future.

Learn more

 

Feeling Blue? Go Green!

With about 350 days of sunshine a year and a vast learning laboratory of desert, sky islands, cities, and even a nearby sea, the University of Arizona offers infinite opportunities for research, education, and engagement with the surrounding environment. Discover all the ways you can get involved, from majors and minors to clubs and activities.

Explore our Green Guides

Congratulations to Diana Liverman,
former co-director of the Institute of the Environment!

Diana Liverman Elected to National Academy of Sciences and American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Regents Professor Diana Liverman, who studies the human dimensions of global environmental change, was elected to two of the nation's oldest and most prestigious honorary societies. READ MORE

From Greenfeed
New Mexico mountains

Recap of CCASS/SW CASC Ecosystem Resilience Workshop

A recap of the second Ecosystem Resilience workshop, “Ecosystem Transformation After Large-Scale Disturbance,” where presenters focused on forest management and fire in the context of ecosystem resilience.

Arizona still in a mega-drought

Arizona’s in the midst of perhaps the worst drought in 1,200 years, regardless of the blessings of a relatively normal winter, according to study published in the peer-reviewed journal Science.

Salt, Verde watersheds may prove less vulnerable to drought

Arizona’s already hot and dry. So if it gets hotter and drier – we’re toast. Right? Well, not necessarily – leastwise, not on the Salt and Verde watersheds.

Trees remember everything—even the fall of the roman empire

The timeline of the failure of the Roman state is fairly well established and accepted, thanks to the Romans' love of writing. The circumstances contributing to its disintegration, however, have long been debated among historians and archaeologists. There is no consensus about the relative role of internal failures, such as escalating corruption and civil war, versus external factors, such as the barbarian invasions and pandemics.

Tumamoc Hill reopening Memorial Day

Hikers will be required to wear face masks and stay at least six feet apart from other visitors to Tumamoc Hill once the popular outdoor attraction reopens Memorial Day, next Monday, May 25.
 

Aspen face new threat

Oh, no. Arizona’s dwindling aspen groves face yet another threat.

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