JEDI Support for AIR Personnel

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Introduction

*Content Warning: This section and the resources it links to include information about mental health struggles, including suicide, and interpersonal violence, and racism. These are not graphic nor descriptive depictions. However, several of these resources refer to these struggles. 

The goal of this section is to connect AIR staff with resources that are crucial during difficult times, for both individuals and communities. The resources herein are focused on mental health, expressing concerns, and finding support. The more accessible and familiar we are with these resources, the more likely our staff will benefit from them when they are needed, thereby fostering a more inclusive and just workplace environment and culture. 

This section of the AIR JEDI Guidebook covers: 

  1. Learning to Support AIR Personnel
  2. Mental Health Resources
  3. Resources for Expressing Concerns or Complaints
  4. Resources for Responding to Concerns or Complaints
  5. Resources to Support Mentors in the Mentorship Program

Some tips for navigating this page: 

  • There are three different types of resources on this page. They include: (1) internal links to UArizona websites, (2) external links to non-UArizona websites, and (3) links to downloadable documents. Internal links will not open a new tab, unless they guide you to a document. An external link will have a small triangle at the right end, pointing away from the link, and open a new tab. You can preview any linked text by hovering over it. The preview will either appear above your cursor or in the bottom left of your internet window. 
  • There is a table of contents for this page at the beginning, just after the main title. Each category on the list is hyperlinked to those sections, so you can use that link to quickly navigate to a section you are interested in.
  • The resources are organized in "panels," which hold resources on a shared topic. These panels can open and close when the top border is clicked.
  • Since many of the panels are long, there are "Back to top" links at the end of each panel that will take you back to the very top of this site to help you reorient after lots of scrolling. 

Learning to Support AIR Personnel

*Content Warning: Resources in this section discuss homophobia, racism, and associated struggles. Specific resources are marked with an asterisk (*).

In this section are educational resources on the subjects of an inclusive workplace, gender and sexuality, accessibility, empathy, and COVID-19. There are also more resources on a variety of topics grouped together in a “various subjects” panel. By consulting these learning materials, we better position ourselves to understand and respect our staff, thereby fostering a more inclusive and just workplace. 

Cheat Sheet of Resources for Students and Employees

This Google document, maintained by the UArizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, lists resources for UArizona students and employees.

 

Tucson Resources

This list of resources from the UArizona Office of Diversity and Inclusion includes "a number of organizations [beyond UArizona] that are providing multicultural services and support" that "can be helpful to students, faculty, staff, alumni and other individuals living in Southern Arizona."

 

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"Underrepresented faculty play a disproportionate role in advancing diversity and inclusion"

The findings of this journal article suggest that "faculty with underrepresented identities disproportionally engage in diversity and inclusion activities, yet such engagement was not considered important for tenure.” 

Citation: Jimenez, M. F., Laverty, T. M., Bombaci, S. P., Wilkins, K., Bennett, D. E., & Pejchar, L. (2019). Underrepresented faculty play a disproportionate role in advancing diversity and inclusion. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 3(7), 1030–1033. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-019-0911-5

 

How to Promote Racial Equity in the Workplace: A five-step plan

This five-step plan comes from Robert Livingston at the Harvard Business Review suggests that companies "move through the five stages of a process called PRESS: (1) Problem awareness, (2) Root-cause analysis, (3) Empathy, or level of concern about the problem and the people it afflicts, (4) Strategies for addressing the problem, and (5) Sacrifice, or willingness to invest the time, energy, and resources necessary for strategy implementation."

 

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*Content warning: Resources in this section discuss homophobia, racism, and associated struggles. Specific resources are marked with an asterisk (*).

What's Your Pronoun? Strategies for Inclusion in the Workplace

This guide from Out & Equal "supports employers’ understanding of the intersection of daily communications, pronoun usage, gender identity, and expression at work, as well as practical strategies for inclusion.”

Note: Some folks may have more than one set of pronouns. There are more resources on pronouns within this panel. 

 

Best Practices for Non-Binary Inclusion in the Workplace

This guide from Out & Equal "details a variety of specific best practices for creating welcoming workplace environments for non-binary employees.”

 

Supporting Intersex Inclusion in the Workplace

“The following guide, co-authored by interACT and Out & Equal, is intended to support employers in raising awareness about intersex identity, the intersex community and catalyze actionable steps for creating more inclusive, supportive workplaces.”

 

Ally Guiding Behaviors

This guide from Out & Equal "outlines guiding behaviors for those becoming allies to LGBTQ colleagues.”

 

Queer & Trans People of Color (QTPOC) Resources at UArizona and in Tucson

This webpage, maintained by UArizona LGBTQ Affairs, lists resources offered at the University of Arizona, and beyond, including Events and Services, Resources, Relevant Policies, and Media.

 

UArizona/Tucson Native American and Two-Spirit Resource Guide*

*Content warning: Some of the following resources within contain discussions of racism, colonialism, boarding schools, intergenerational trauma, hate crimes, alcoholism and drug use, and houselessness.

This resource guide lists resources for queer Native folks, particularly those accessible at UArizona. 

At this time, we are unable to identify the author. We would like to credit them, so if you know who created this guide and they are comfortable with being publicly credited, please let us know. Thank you!

 

UArizona/Tucson Queer and Trans People of Color (QTPOC) Resource Guide*

*Content warning: Some of the following resources contain discussions of white supremacy, racism, colonialism, xenophobia, harassment, violence, hate crimes, houselessness, mass incarceration and policing, deportation, depression, and suicide.

This resource guide lists resources for queer and trans people of color, particularly those accessible at UArizona. 

At this time, we are unable to identify the author. We would like to credit them, so if you know who created this guide and they are comfortable with being publicly credited, please let us know. Thank you!

 

UArizona LGBTQA+ History Resource Guide*

*Content warning: The following resource contains discussions of homophobia, transphobia, white supremacy, racism, colonialism, hate crimes, violence, policing and police violence, and sexual assault.

This resource guide lists information and resources on LGBTQA+ history.

At this time, we are unable to identify the author. We would like to credit them, so if you know who created this guide and they are comfortable with being publicly credited, please let us know. Thank you!

 

UArizona Statement on Restroom Access

The UArizona's statement on restroom access from the Office of Institutional Equity affirms that the University:

  • "allows individuals to use the restroom that corresponds to their gender identity."
  • "is committed to designating and maintaining a gender-neutral restroom in as many of its buildings as reasonably feasible."
  • "is committed to include at least one gender-neutral restroom in new buildings constructed on campus to the extent feasible."

 

Challenging Patriarchy and Sexism Resource Packet

This resource from the Anti-Oppression Resource and Training Alliance (AORTA) lists strategies and reflections by which we can challenge patriarchy and sexism. 

 

For reference writers: Avoiding gender bias in reference writing

This resource from the UArizona Commission on the Status of Women offers some advice on ways to remove unconscious gender bias from our writing, especially when preparing letters of reference.

 

Gender-Inclusive Language

This webpage from the Writing Center at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill "will help you make decisions about using gendered language in your writing."

 

More Resources on Pronouns

 

“Why should cis people put their pronouns in their bio?”

This resource is a Carrd made by @IunaIoud, a trans man, on Twitter. You can advance to the next card by toggling the blue bee at the bottom of the Carrd.

 

“How to do better at getting new pronouns right”

This resource from Ethan Tai Bossuyt, @tai.draws, on Instagram offers guidance on how to get pronouns right.

 

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Inclusive Workplace Practices: Universal Design in the Workplace

This resource from the UArizona Disability Resource Center details Universal Design principles for the workplace.

 

Assistive Technology Resources

This resource from the UArizona Disability Resource Center lists hardware and software to enhance and ensure accessibility of audio, visual, and physical content.

 

Information for Employees

This resource from the UArizona Disability Resource Center outlines the process by which employees can make requests for reasonable accommodations. 

 

Information for Supervisors

This resource from the UArizona Disability Resource Center outlines the process by which a supervisor should respond to requests for reasonable accommodations.

 

Pregnancy Accommodations

This resource from the UArizona Disability Resource Center details the resources are available for pregnant and parenting undergraduate students, graduate students, and employees. 

 

A Guide to Planning Accessible and Inclusive Events

This resource from the UArizona Disability Resource Center helps us to identify and remove barriers to access throughout the event planning process to host inclusive and welcoming experiences for our diverse community. 

 

Marketing, Communication, And Registration Processes in Event Planning

This resource from the UArizona Disability Resource Center encourages that our marketing materials include information about an event's accessibility features, such as where to find accessible parking, entrances, and seating. 

Diversity Access Statements in Event Planning

This resource from the UArizona Disability Resource Center offers guidance on preparing access statements for event marketing.

 

Request to Promote your Event through UArizona Social Media

Submit an event to be featured on official University of Arizona socials.

 

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Dr. Brené Brown on Empathy

In this video, "Dr. Brené Brown reminds us that we can only create a genuine empathic connection if we are brave enough to really get in touch with our own fragilities." 

 

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Coping with Stress Related to COVID-19

This resource from UArizona Campus Health includes links, videos, apps, music, meditations, and more for managing stress and anxiety during the pandemic.

 

 10 Tips for Coping with COVID-19

This video from UArizona Campus Health recommends 10 ways you can take good care of yourself during a time of social distancing. 

 

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Worker Self-Direction Resources

“The truth is, structure matters. How you do your work is equally as important as the work itself.”

These resources from Resist. describe their structure as a Worker Self-Directed Non-Profit (WSDNP). Their "model consists of the board of directors, the staff collective, and three external decision making bodies. Each of these groups has specific functions and decision-making powers as delegated to them by the Board of Directors. These groups do not work in silos, members of the Resist community are often part of more than one decision making body. This ensures that all proposals, discussions, and decisions are in conversation with the other moving pieces within the organization." 

Find more about what a Worker Self-Directed Non-Profit (WSDNP) is and what the model looks like for Resist.:

 

Culture of Care

This resource details "small-scale resilience practices that continue to move us towards being better, more connected, whole people."

 

Mutual Support and Accountability

This resource reflects on Resist.'s relationship to mutual support and accountability. The following is a preview: "Being a Worker Self-Directed Nonprofit has its challenges and for a lot of folks, it’s difficult to imagine how a flat structure could work in their organization, in any organization. The truth is that the success of this structure relies heavily on building collective trust. At Resist, we’ve developed this trust through a practice of mutual support and accountability."

 

Dismantling Anti-Blackness In Democratic Workplaces: A Toolkit

The goal of this toolkit from the Anti-Oppression Resource and Training Alliance (AORTA) is "to equip democratic workplaces with tools to see and address anti-Black racism when it happens, as well as creating systems and practices that undermine anti-Black racism." 

 

Collectivizing Leadership Structures

This photo essay reflects on the question “So how do we show up for everyone who shows up?" The resource dives into "valuing horizontal organizing dynamics.”

 

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Educational Pamphlets from the UArizona Office of Diversity and Inclusion

*Content Warning: Resources in this section discuss oppression. 

Cultural Appropriation

Cultural appropriation “…refers to a particular power dynamic in which members of a dominant culture take elements from a culture of people who have been systemically oppressed by that dominant group” (Johnson, 2015). This pamphlet contextualizes cultural appropriation, providing some common examples of the practice and its impact.

 

Implicit Bias

Implicit bias “refers to the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner” (Kirwan Institute, 2015). This pamphlet provides more information on implicit bias and how to combat it. 

 

Microaggressions

Microaggressions are “the everyday verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs or insults, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages to target persons based solely upon their marginalized group membership” (Sue et al., 2007). This pamphlet provides more information on microaggressions and how to combat them.

 

Islamophobia

Islamophobia is “the fear and/or hatred of Islam, Muslims or Islamic culture and history” (RISC, 2011). This pamphlet provides more information about Islam and Islamophobia and works to challenge many of the assumptions made about the Muslim community.

 

Intersex

This pamphlet provides some information about terminology and allyship towards intersex communities.

 

LGBTQIA

This pamphlet provides some information about terminology and allyship towards the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex, aromantic, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) communities.

 

Transgender Inclusivity

This pamphlet provides some information about terminology and allyship towards transgender communities. 

 

"Recognizing Emotional Labor in Academe"

In this blog post for Inside Higher Ed, Julie Shayne argues that "as institutions fail to meet the needs of minoritized and traumatized students, the faculty members who work to fill the gaps should be acknowledged."

 

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To find more resources on supporting personnel, try a search for your topic with phrases like “in the workplace” or “diverse workplace.” In short, if you are searching more broadly, try pairing the topic you are searching for resources on with terminology we use in JEDI conversations. Otherwise, it is a good practice to keep up with the resources available on the UArizona Human Resources and Office of Diversity and Inclusion webpages. 


Mental Health Resources

*Content Warning: Resources in this section discuss mental health struggles, including suicide, and interpersonal violence. Specific resources are marked with an asterisk (*).

In this section are resources on mental health, self-care, suicide prevention, COVID-19, and more. There is a section with resources for students and for working with students. Through all of these topics, the resources include toolkits, articles, and information about support organizations.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, consider seeking immediate support through a crisis hotline. Find a list of crisis hotline phone numbers.

*Content warning: Resources in this section discuss racism and associated struggles.

Mental Health Resources for BIPOC

This Google document lists and links mental health resources, including therapists, podcasts, articles, blogs, and apps, specifically for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC).

 

Surviving & Resisting Hate: A Toolkit for People of Color

This toolkit from the #ICRaceLab, Dr. Hector Y. Adames, and Dr. Nayeli Y. Chavez-Dueñas offers tips for taking care of yourself in times of hyper-visible and heightened oppression and injustice. 

 

"Self Care for People of Color After Psychological Trauma"

This blog post by "Just Jasmine" details ways to tend to "our wellbeing when we are inundated with racism."

 

Race and Mental Health Resources

This resource from Project LETS lists and links race-specific resources and information on mental health.

 

Racial Trauma Toolkit

This toolkit from Boston College offers guidance for managing post trauma symptoms. Additional resources include the toolkit's manuscript and infographic.

Use the following reference to cite both the manuscript and the infographic: Jernigan, M. M., Green, C. E., Perez-Gualdron, Liu, M. M, Henze, K. T., Chen, Helms, J. E. (2015). #racialtraumaisreal. Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture, Chestnut Hill, MA.  Retrieved from: https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/schools/lynch-school/sites/isprc/isprc-advisor...

 

Toolkits & Resources

This resource from Black Emotional and Mental Health (BEAM) includes educational graphics, videos, and toolkits. The resources are organized in the following categories: Journal Prompts for Wellness, COVID-19 Support, BEAM x Lipton Affirmation Toolkits, Graphics: Accountability, Self Control and Emotional Awareness, Toolkits/Worksheets, and Videos.

 

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"How to Make a Self-Care Checklist That Actually Works for You"

"A solid self-care checklist will reflect your specific needs, habits, and time considerations." Learn how to prepare a self-care checklist.

 

"4 Self-Care Resources for Days When the World is Terrible"

This article by Miriam Zoila Pérez for Color Lines lists "some self-care resources to keep you going when the trauma won’t stop."

 

"Tips for Self-Care: When Police Brutality Has You Questioning Humanity and Social Media Is Enough"

This article by Dr. Imani J. Walker for The Root details "some options for self-care when police brutality has you questioning humanity and social media is enough." 

 

Self-Help Guides

These guides from the University of Northern Texas are to supplement or prepare you for counseling related to mental health struggles.

 

Caring for yourself to care for others: A burnout and vicarious trauma toolkit

This toolkit by Larissa Pham (@lrsphm on Instagram) "was created on June 6, 2020, with the intention of providing resources for self-care and healing amid the very necessary work of organizing specifically against anti-Black racism and police brutality, though these principles apply to any kind of movement work, and these movements are intersectional. This is a toolkit for organizers, students, parents, allies, and anyone for whom its message resonates."

Find more resources associated with the toolkit.

 

"Taking care of your mental health"

This Instagram-based resource from So.Informed, @so.informed* on Instagram, offers tips for self care. 

*The individual who runs this page, Jessica Natale, was held accountable in August 2021 by several communities for neglecting to be transparent and take action after being told they were benefitting from and appropriating the work of Ijeoma Oluo, the author of So You Want to Talk About Racism (2018). Natale's page was originally named "So You Want to Talk About," and until just recently, had not made it clear that their page was not affiliated with Ijeoma Oluo. Due to the lack of transparency around who ran the page, many folks thought it was Ijeoma Oluo who ran the page. This issue brings up an important question we are collectively learning to navigate: how do we value the work of those who harm/have harmed others, especially when those resources are meaningful to unlearning, healing, and building more just worlds? 

 

Self-Care for Trauma, Grief, and Depression

This self-care list comes from adrienne maree brown, Autumn Brown, Mark-Anthony Johnson, Naima Penniman, and Adaku Utah.

 

"Self care list: how to take care of your self while learning about oppression (with unaware people)"

This self-care list comes from fabian romero.

 

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Student’s Guide to Radical Healing

This guide aims to "provide you with some insight on how trauma can impact us, and how to address those different impacts."

Contributors: writing: Holly Ramella, Brenda M. Hernandez, Ashley Yuill, Jean Munson, Liz Carasco, Monica Jackson; layout: Monet Green; illustration: Briana Calacsan

 

Caring for Yourself is a Radical Act: Self-Care Guide for Youth Working in Community

This guide by Farrah Khan offers ideas about healing on your own and in community.

 

UArizona Campus Health Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

UArizona "Campus Health is committed to positioning itself as an exceptional health center by fostering an inclusive culture that encourages, supports, and celebrates the diverse backgrounds of our employees and the community we serve." Learn more about their anti-racism resources or visit their Diversity & Inclusion webpage.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Services and Resources for Underrepresented Groups include:

Students of Color Support Group

 "Now more than ever, the University of Arizona recognizes that it is critically important for students of color to be able to connect with and get support from their communities, regardless of physical distance. To help meet that need, Counseling & Psych Services providers Erica Granillo, Debra Cox-Howard, Patti Norris, and Ishani Deo will be offering a free, biweekly, drop-in support group specifically for students of color, with the goal of creating a safe and easily accessible space for you to seek support if you need it."

 

Connecting with Pride LGBTQ+ Drop-In Support Group

The Connecting with Pride LGBTQ+ Drop-In Support Group is "a safe and friendly space for UArizona students to meet others and discuss a variety of topics such as coming out, gender identities, and navigating family issues. This group is facilitated by LGBTQ+ staff, and is free of charge and confidential. Drop-in at any time!"

 

LGBTQ+ Health

This webpage indicates UArizona CAPS' commitment to providing services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) students and lists services of interest to folks with these identities.

 

Cultural & Resource Center Counselors & Liaisons

CAPS Counselors and Liaisons provide consultation, guidance, and resources to students at each of the campus Cultural and Resource Centers.

Learn more.

 

Short-Term Counseling

"CAPS offers brief, solution-focused therapy. In just a few counseling sessions, you'll focus on your specific goals, explore solutions to your concerns, and learn strategies to help you achieve your goals."

Learn more about counseling for students at CAPS.

 

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UArizona Life & Work Connections

Life & Work Connections has expanded free counseling services for benefits-eligible employees. They provide wellness services to UArizona employees. These services are voluntary, confidential, and unlimited. 

Additional resources coordinated or provided by Life & Work Connections include Community Financial Resources, Adult and Elder Care Consultations, Resources and Support for Parents, and Childcare & Elder Care Resources (see below).

Childcare & Elder Care Resources

Sick and Back-Up Childcare services are "available when there is an unexpected interruption in your regularly scheduled childcare. These services are designed to help support employees in fulfilling work-related commitments and students in fulfilling coursework-related commitments. The University of Arizona offers eligible employees and students up to 10 sick and backup childcare usages per fiscal year. Once registered, you can immediately begin using the Sick and Back-Up Childcare Program."

The Childcare Choice – Employee program "offers up to $2,000 in reimbursements per fiscal year per household for qualifying childcare. The childcare you claim must occur in Arizona, and it must be work related (i.e., necessary to allow you or other usual caregivers to attend work). To participate, you must be eligible for full benefits as a University of Arizona employee." 

Childcare Consultations are a "shared, educational opportunity to discuss thoughtful issues and responsive strategies for identifying, assessing, and selecting childcare and enrichment experiences."

 

Resilient Arizona Crisis Counseling Program

Resilient Arizona provides free and confidential crisis counseling.

 

Wellness Ambassadors

Wellness Ambassadors, a program from UArizona Life and Work Connections, trains employees to "promote workplace wellness and create a culture of well-being."

"By taking part in the Wellness Ambassadors program, individual departments and units help foster an environment in which employees can thrive. Wellness Ambassadors provide their units with: 

  • Regular communications about wellness initiatives, opportunities, and resources.
  • Assistance in generating and developing ideas to meet local wellness needs and interests.
  • Support in the coordination and implementation of wellness activities (e.g., walking groups, health challenges, mindfulness breaks).
  • Encouragement to co-workers interested in participating in University wellness initiatives."

 

Bias Education & Support Team (BEST)

“The UArizona Bias Education and Support Team is a resource for all members of the University community who believe they have experienced or been made aware of a bias-related incident that would not constitute a violation of the Nondiscrimination and Anti-harassment Policy, but for which they would like to seek support and/or facilitate educational opportunities for themselves or others.”

 

Campus Health Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

UArizona "Campus Health is committed to positioning itself as an exceptional health center by fostering an inclusive culture that encourages, supports, and celebrates the diverse backgrounds of our employees and the community we serve." Learn more about their anti-racism resources or visit their Diversity & Inclusion webpage.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Services and Resources for Underrepresented Groups include:

LGBTQ+ Health

This webpage indicates UArizona CAPS' commitment to providing services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) students and lists services of interest to folks with these identities.

 

Behavioral Health Clinic

"The Behavioral Health Clinic at the University of Arizona is a training facility for advanced psychology trainees enrolled in the Clinical Psychology PhD program at UArizona.

The BHC is dedicated to providing high-quality and affordable treatment and assessment services to the UArizona and Tucson community while providing exceptional training for the graduate students as they learn the latest psychological treatment and assessment approaches."

 

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Health and Wellness Resources for Faculty and Staff during COVID-19

This webpage is a collection of health and wellness resources, specifically for faculty and staff, in navigating COVID-19. This work is a joint effort between Student Wellness & Retention and the Student Admin Systems Group. 

 

Health and Wellness Resources for Students and Parents during COVID-19

This webpage is a collection of health and wellness resources, specifically for students and parents, in navigating COVID-19. This work is a joint effort between Student Wellness & Retention and the Student Admin Systems Group. 

 

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Suicide Prevention Classes: Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR) Training 

"In this training, participants learn to recognize the warning signs of suicide, offer hope, get help, and save a life."

Life & Work Connections and Campus Health offer periodic QPR Gatekeeper Training sessions that are open to any interested staff members, faculty, and students. Trainings can be brought to your department or classroom and customized between 90 minutes and 120 minutes in length.

If you have questions or would like to set up a session, contact Chad Myler at cmyler@email.arizona.edu or 520-626-4760 or Christi Castillo at christiclauson@email.arizona.edu or 520-621-4251."

 

Signs of Psychological Crisis and Suicide Risk

This UArizona CAPS webpage defines psychological crisis, lists suicide warning signs, and resources to get help. 

 

“Suicide Intervention (for Weirdos, Freaks, and Queers)”

This zine by Tiny Lantern is a "resource with peer and community-based strategies for supporting folks in our lives who might be suicidal, as well as examining the beliefs and structures that keep suicide conversations under wraps." View the resource on their website.

 

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Virtual Grief Resources

This padlet of resources on grief was curated by Blu Au as a resource offered by the Women & Gender Resource Center (WGRC). 

 

Mental Health & Wellness Resources

This Google document is a list of resources and support organizations for mental health and wellness. Some of the resources are New York City-specific, but there are still many that are accessible to us in Arizona. 

 

“What is mental health?”

This webpage from Project LETS offers guidance on talking about mental health struggles of your own and learning to support others.

 

"Practices for moving through grief"

This resource from adrienne maree brown, Autumn Brown, Mark-Anthony Johnson, Naima Penniman, and Adaku Utah lists some practices to support the process of mourning and grieving, "particularly in response to Black lives lost to anti-Black state violence."

 

"17 Poems To Read When The World Is Too Much"

This article by Hannah Giorgis and Tomi Obaro for BuzzFeed News recommends multiple poems to read when things get difficult. 

 

Stronger Than Resilience Tools

UArizona CAPS created Stronger Than based on the core elements of resilience: perspective, authenticity, and connection. These resilience tools are among the Stronger Than tools and activities to "bring resilience to your daily life."

 

Pathways to Wellness Program

The Pathways to Wellness program from UArizona CAPS helps you get "to know where you stand, what you want, and what you need in each domain helps you pick and choose the pieces that will forge your unique wellness path. In Pathways to Wellness, you can explore these wellness domains: academic, emotional, environmental, financial, interpersonal, occupational, physical, spiritual, and stage of life."

 

Take Charge of Your Well-Being in COVID-19 Resources

These resources from UArizona CAPS list "ways to take charge of your own health & well-being" during COVID-19 on topics such as health hygiene, connecting with others, nourishing yourself, supporting your mental health, moving your body, getting good sleep, protecting your heat and lungs, and consuming responsibly. 

 

Healing Resources for Trying Times

This Google document lists a variety of resources for mental health and self-care. 

 

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A good starting place to look for more mental health resources is the UArizona Campus Health website. Beyond that, try searching the websites of organizations aimed at advancing such resources to under-resourced communities. Examples of these organizations include Project LETS and Black Emotional and Mental Health (BEAM). Organization websites often have a section just for resources. 


Resources for Expressing Concern or Complaints

These resources list the UArizona departments with formal avenues for reporting discrimination, harassment, and retaliation. The section also includes other places to get support in expressing similar and different concerns. 

Research, Innovation, and Impact (RII) Employee Services

RII Employee Services:

  1. "are liaisons to UA Human Resources;
  2. are the first point of contact for most Human Resources (HR) matters;
  3. interpret and explain HR policies;
  4. responsible for day-to-day HR activities and transactions;
  5. support Search Committees through all stages of the recruitment process and onboard new hires;
  6. represent RII on committees and groups that impact HR processes;
  7. support managers/supervisors with performance management/career conversations;
  8. collaborate on the development of staffing plans."

Employee Services presentation

This presentation from February 2021 outlines the work of RII Employee Services. 

 

​​RII Employee Services Staff

  • Joanne Canalli, Director, Employee Services
  • Andrea Lawyer, Coordinator, Employee Services
  • Angie Bohorquez, Office Specialist, Senior­

 

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These departments are among those that are responsible for responding to reports of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation at the University of Arizona. In this section, you will find information on how to report such concerns to each of these departments.  

UArizona Office of Institutional Equity (OIE)

“The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) supports all students, faculty, and staff by upholding our institution’s Nondiscrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy and responding to reports of discrimination including sexual harassment, sexual violence, relationship violence, gender discrimination, and stalking. This office is your best first stop for any questions or concerns related to discrimination, harassment or retaliation."

"OIE is the place to bring your requests for assistance related to issues involving discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation related to a protected classification and, therefore, addressed by our policies. The protected classifications include race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or genetic information.” However, “...workplace climate issues may not be related to protected classifications under our policies, and thus OIE is not able to take action on reports of discrimination related to these issues.”

“OIE strongly encourages faculty and staff who learn of possible instances of discriminatory conduct to follow the 3Rs: Refer, Report, Record. By following this process, you simultaneously ensure that the impacted person is connected to the best resource available to take action on their issue, you effectively fulfill your reporting responsibilities, and you make a record of your response. Referring students and employees affected by discrimination to OIE is as easy as sending an email. OIE’s website includes template language that may be helpful in crafting your referral e-mail. If you have any questions about the referral process or would like assistance in determining if a referral is appropriate, please contact OIE at equity@email.arizona.edu or (520) 621-9449. Visit OIE’s website to learn more about the University of Arizona’s process for responding to reported information.”

Submit a Discrimination/Harassment Report

Students and employees who experience or are aware of discriminatory conduct can contact our Office of Institutional Equity to report discrimination or harassment. You may also contact OIE directly at (520) 621-9449 or equity@email.arizona.edu to request an appointment and to learn more about OIE’s process and procedures, and whether they potentially apply to your concern. 

 

Title IX Reporting

Title IX states that "no person in the United States shall on the basis of sex be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance."

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) serves in a role of primary Title IX administration, accepts complaints, oversees the Interim Procedures and provides interim actions and supportive measures. Visit the OIE Title IX website.

Reporting options include (1) report or complaint against or about an employee, visitor, vendor or contractor and (2) report against or about a student. 

You may contact OIE directly to request an appointment and to learn more about OIE’s procedures. You can also request accommodations to facilitate a meeting, including disability-related and language barriers. 

Contact: Mary Beth Tucker, Title IX Coordinator, equity@arizona.edu, 520-621-9438

Brochure

The Title IX administration team compiled a collection of resources and information to assist members of the University community in this Title IX brochure.

 

UArizona Human Resources (HR)

Report an Incident

Use this web-based form “to report non-urgent workplace violence, safety concerns, or policy violations” to Human Resources. 

 

Dispute Resolution Policies

This webpage outlines “University policy, formal University processes, and resources to help employees come to a sustainable consensus.” 

 

Human Resources Organizational Consultant

Human Resources Consultants "work with supervisors and employees, respectively, to foster a positive and effective workplace for all. They are excellent resources for workplace concerns that are not related to protected category status as set forth in the Nondiscrimination and Anti-harassment Policy."

"Human Resources Organizational Consultants are available to assist leaders in their management roles. HR Consultants are HR professionals who consult with leaders to foster an effective workplace for all members of the University. HR Consultants have assigned client groups and are available to support leaders and provide collaborative problem-solving solutions.
Consultants are available to partner with leaders on workplace issues that include:

  • Performance management
  • Conflict management
  • Management coaching
  • Effective communication
  • Policy navigation
  • Career Conversations/performance evaluations
  • Reorganizational assistance
  • Layoff and nonrenewal guidance
  • Complex leave issues
  • Employee Union membership"

As part of Research, Innovation, & Impact (RII), AIR’s consultant is Mel Egginton, who can be reached by email at melegginton@arizona.edu or by phone at 520-257-8498. 

 

UArizona Ethics and Compliance Hotline 

The University’s Ethics and Compliance Hotline is "an anonymous, 24/7 resource for reporting concerns about legal or policy violations or unethical conduct. By reporting your concerns, you can help ensure the University is following the highest standards of compliance and ethics."

 

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These UArizona departments are among those that may be supportive in reporting concerns not involving discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation related to a protected classification.

Resources for Graduate Students

Summary of Grievance Types and Responsible Parties

This webpage from the Graduate College provides resources and contacts for certain types of issues including academic, resulting from inappropriate behavior of another person, involving a Graduate Assistant/Associate (GA), and involving a disability.

 

Grievance Policy

The Graduate College's grievance policy is as follows: "Should a graduate student feel he or she has been treated unfairly, there are a number of resources available. With few exceptions, students should first attempt to resolve difficulties informally by bringing those concerns directly to the person responsible for the action, or with the student's graduate advisor, the department head, or the immediate supervisor of the person responsible for the action. If the problem cannot be resolved informally, the student may be able to file a formal grievance." Learn more about the grievance policy.

 

Office of the Ombuds

The Office of the Ombuds is “a confidential, informal, impartial, and independent resource for effective communication, collaboration, and conflict management.” The Office was "established to create a climate on the University campus which provides employees and students with an option other than formal grievance procedures to resolve disputes." Here is their invitation: "Are you unsure of how to handle a complex, tense, or unideal situation with a supervisor, colleague, classmate, or roommate? Are you interested in responding to a situation in the most effective way possible? Do you have a situation that has gotten out of hand? We invite you to contact us to help you move forward in a responsive and positive manner, no matter how small, large, or messy your situation may be. If it isn’t something we can assist you with directly, we can connect you to other helpful resources.”

 

Life & Work Connections

UArizona’s Life & Work Connections program provides holistic health and wellness services for employees, including counseling and coaching related to workplace issues that impact employee well-being. 

Life & Work Connections has partnered with the University of Arizona Behavioral Health Clinic to offer a free, confidential virtual support group to help employees and their dependents learn positive coping skills for dealing with symptoms of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Life & Work Connections provides wellness services to UArizona employees. Their unique whole-person programming can help you at every point in your life cycle. Their services are voluntary, confidential, and unlimited. 

 

Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs

The Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs offers help in “identifying emerging resource and leadership issues, including academic appointments, tenure, promotion, and other faculty affairs.” 

 

Grapevine

Grapevine is an initiative of the UArizona Division of Agriculture, Life and Veterinary Sciences and Cooperative Extension (ALVSCE). They hope that with Grapevine, they can "address rumors, clarify things, and promote transparency."

 

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UArizona Survivor Advocacy

Survivor Advocacy “offers confidential services to UA undergraduate and graduate students. Meeting with Advocates never obligates you to take any further action. Sessions can focus on Title IX reporting, academic accommodations for impacted schoolwork, housing changes, medical support, and more.” 

 

Oasis Sexual Assault and Trauma Services

The Oasis Program at UArizona Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) "provides advocacy, support, and outreach to UA students, staff, and faculty of all genders who are impacted by sexual assault, relationship violence, and stalking. Oasis also offers counseling services for Arizona students and can help direct faculty and other UA staff to off-campus resources if needed."

 

Action Collaborative Partner Network

The University of Arizona is committed to and will actively participate in the Action Collaborative on Preventing Sexual Harassment in Higher Education Partner Network. Thus far, the University has committed to creating a Faculty Fellow for the Prevention of Sexual Harassment who will serve in the Office of the Provost. The fellow will serve as liaison and coordinate efforts on campus by organizing regular meetings with multiple offices dedicated to the prevention of sexual harassment, including the Office of Institutional Equity (which houses Title IX), Human Resources, Faculty Affairs, and the Consortium against Gender Violence. The UArizona Prevention of Sexual Harassment Faculty Fellow is Kathleen Melde (melde@arizona.edu, 520-626-2538). Learn more about the Action Collaborative Partner Network at UArizona.

 

Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault (SACASA) 

The Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault (SACASA) "provides crisis services, advocacy, support, therapy and education for individuals and families impacted by sexual trauma. We provide a safe place for survivors to heal, gain strength, learn coping skills, and develop trusting, caring relationships."

 

Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse

The Center “offers multilingual hotline services, safety planning and an emergency shelter for survivors of sexual and domestic abuse.”

 

Anti-Violence Project

The Anti-Violence Project is a “24/7 bilingual crisis hotline for LGBTQ survivors of violence and harassment.” Their Support Line is available Monday–Friday from 8 AM to 7 PM (Arizona time) and their staff and trained volunteers offer crisis intervention, safety planning, referrals, and support to LGBTQ+ survivors of violence. Support is available in both English and Spanish. All calls are confidential, and callers may remain anonymous.

 

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Microaggressions

Defining and Identifying Microaggressions

 

Responding to and Interrupting Microaggressions

 

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To find more resources on expressing concerns, try looking through the websites of Human Resources departments at UArizona as well as other universities and organizations. Their policies may not always align with UArizona, but we can always learn from others. 


Resources for Responding to Concerns or Complaints

*Content warning: Resources in this section discuss mental health struggles, including suicide, assault, and racism. 

When responding to concerns, it is important to move beyond reporting these issues to the official university department. We can share resources that will help those affected secure safety and support after a traumatic or harmful experience. Most of the resources in this section are those that we can direct folks to for these reasons.

The JEDI Committee recognizes that AIR staff need a clear process by which we can express concerns and expect them to be addressed. We hope that this work will begin soon. Currently, the best advice we can offer is to talk with your supervisor.

Resources forthcoming...

Survivor Advocacy Program

The UArizona Survivor Advocacy program “offers confidential services to UArizona undergraduate and graduate students. Meeting with Advocates never obligates you to take any further action. Sessions can focus on Title IX reporting, academic accommodations for impacted schoolwork, housing changes, medical support, and more.” 

An advocate is a trained professional whose goal is to support and center the needs of the student/survivor. Depending on your needs and concerns, an advocate is able to provide the following:

  • Emotional Support
  • Physical and/or emotional safety planning
  • Help requesting academic accommodations in your courses 
  • Assistance obtaining safe housing and/or housing changes
  • Information and support navigating various reporting options, such as reporting to the police or to the university
  • Help with the UA Appeal Process, Retroactive Withdrawals, and Financial Aid & Scholarships Appeals.
  • Referrals for Mental Health Counseling & Support Groups
  • Support filing a Police Report; both on campus with UAPD, or with Tucson Police Department
  •  Information and support obtaining an Order of Protection (or Injunction Against Harassment) through the courts
  • Information and support obtaining a university-specific No Contact Order 
  • Medical Accompaniment to the hospital and/or information and support regarding a Medical Forensic Exam
  • Court Accompaniment*

*Survivor Advocacy at UArizona can connect you with an advocate from a partner organization to help with these options.

 

Oasis Sexual Assault and Trauma Services

The Oasis Program at UArizona Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) "provides advocacy, support, and outreach to UA students, staff, and faculty of all genders who are impacted by sexual assault, relationship violence, and stalking. Oasis also offers counseling services for Arizona students and can help direct faculty and other UA staff to off-campus resources if needed."

 

Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault (SACASA)

The Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault (SACASA) "provides crisis services, advocacy, support, therapy and education for individuals and families impacted by sexual trauma. We provide a safe place for survivors to heal, gain strength, learn coping skills, and develop trusting, caring relationships."

 

Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse

The Center “offers multilingual hotline services, safety planning and an emergency shelter for survivors of sexual and domestic abuse.” Services for individuals and families experiencing domestic abuse include:

Individual Support: Their community-based services offer one-on-one support and education to anyone who has experienced domestic abuse. These services include:

  • Food, clothing, and other necessities
  • Emotional support and safety planning assistance
  • Information and education about domestic abuse
  • Support with planning next steps and identifying options
  • Opportunities to attend support and education groups
  • Referrals to other agencies and resources
  • Support Groups: provide a safe place for survivors of domestic abuse – including their children – to receive support and education covering a wide variety of topics. Adult and Children’s groups are held at the same time. Participants must complete an intake before attending a support group session.
  • Legal Resources
  • Child & Family Services

Emergency Shelter  - Participants receive: 

  • Access to our emergency shelter facilities
  • Food, clothing, and other necessities
  • Emotional support and safety planning assistance
  • Information and education about domestic abuse
  • Support with planning next steps and identifying options
  • Opportunities to attend support and education groups
  • Referrals to other agencies and resources

 

Anti-Violence Project

The Anti-Violence Project is a “24/7 bilingual crisis hotline for LGBTQ survivors of violence and harassment.” Their Support Line is available Monday–Friday from 8 AM to 7 PM (Arizona time) and their staff and trained volunteers offer crisis intervention, safety planning, referrals, and support to LGBTQ+ survivors of violence. Support is available in both English and Spanish. All calls are confidential, and callers may remain anonymous.

Services they provide include: 

  • Case Management: ongoing crisis intervention, safety planning, and goal planning based on the needs and wishes of survivors. They assist with survivors with basic needs such as food, transportation, and linkage to public benefits. We provide advocacy and support for clients choosing to seek orders of protection, attend court proceedings, and obtain victim benefit/entitlement counseling. They can also provide linkages to other services that clients may require such as medical care, mental health counseling, support groups as needed. The client and the AVP Case Manager will work together towards achieving the client’s goals and adjust the service plan as needed and determined by the client. Case Management availability is limited by the capacity of case managers to accept new clients and may not always be available.
  • Short Term Emergency Shelter: Shelter is available for LGBTQ survivors of violence who become homeless fleeing violence. Shelter is provided in the form of vouchers to local motels we partner with. Shelter availability is limited and may not always be available.
  • They offer several housing programs for persons who become homeless fleeing violence and require longer term support to achieve safety and stability. This includes rapid rehousing and transitional housing lasting up to six months or longer based on availability and when appropriate. Housing capacity is limited and may not always be available.
  • Education and Training: Their staff work to raise awareness of the realities of violence against and within the LGBTQ+ community. They work to change public attitudes that tolerate or instigate violence by educating the broader community and service providers on LGBTQ cultural competency. They also offer trainings on the intersections of the LGBTQ community with domestic violence, sexual assault, sexual violence, and hate violence. Please contact them to request education or training.

 

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*Content warning: Resources in this section discuss mental health struggles, including suicide, and assault.

Bias Education & Support Team (BEST)

“The UArizona Bias Education and Support Team is a resource for all members of the University community who believe they have experienced or been made aware of a bias-related incident that would not constitute a violation of the Nondiscrimination and Anti-harassment Policy, but for which they would like to seek support and/or facilitate educational opportunities for themselves or others.”

 

Life & Work Connections

UArizona’s Life & Work Connections program provides holistic health and wellness services for employees, including counseling and coaching related to workplace issues that impact employee well-being. 

Life & Work Connections has partnered with the University of Arizona Behavioral Health Clinic to offer a free, confidential virtual support group to help employees and their dependents learn positive coping skills for dealing with symptoms of anxiety, depression, and stress.

Life & Work Connections provides wellness services to UArizona employees. Their unique whole-person programming can help you at every point in your life cycle. Their services are voluntary, confidential, and unlimited. 

 

Disability Resource Center

The Disability Resource Center leads the University in a progressive and proactive approach to campus accessibility. Its goal is to ensure that disabled employees, students  and visitors have a similar, if not identical, experience to that of  their non-disabled counterparts.

 

Dean of Students Office

The Dean of Students Office, through the Student Assistance staff, provides supportive measures for  students who report experiencing sexual misconduct or who are involved in sexual harassment investigations or adjudications.

 

Survivor Advocacy Program

The Survivor Advocacy Program is a confidential resource for students who have experienced sexual harassment, including sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, that can assist students in navigating University and community resources depending on their wishes and needs. 

 

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*Content warning: Resources in this section discuss racism and associated struggles.

Resources for responding to white nationalist rallies after Charlottesville

This resource from the Catalyst Project is a "list of resources on understanding the historical and systemic context of white nationalism, antifa, what actions you can take, articles on anti-semitism in white nationalism, and current white nationalist movements.”

 

Navigating Conflict in Movement Organizations

This resource from the Anti-Oppression Resource and Training Alliance (AORTA) offers guidance on how our organizations can be better "able to move through conflict with strength and alignment so we can be more effective at winning justice."

 

Show Up: Your Guide to Bystander Intervention

This guide to bystander intervention is from the Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP) and Hollaback!. 

 

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If you are looking for more resources on responding to concerns at the UArizona, try searching the websites of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Office of Institutional Equity. Additionally, connect with the Bias Education & Support Team (BEST), who will be able to connect you with additional resources. 

Beyond UArizona, try searching for organizations aimed at providing resources in response to certain concerns/issues. If you are hoping to find more regional resources, try adding "Tucson" or "Southern Arizona" to your search. 


Resources to Support Mentors in the Mentorship Program

The AIR JEDI Committee’s recommendations to AIR leadership to better incorporate justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) principles into AIR include a voluntary mentorship program. The resources herein aim to support such an initiative with resources on mentorship and mentoring relationships.

Mentoring Toolkit from the UArizona Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI)

This toolkit is focused on faculty mentoring. The following is ODI's description of the toolkit: "Mentoring provides benefits to both the individuals involved and the larger institution — especially when it comes to cultivating a diverse university. Mentoring has been shown to increase personal satisfaction, productivity and retention. Plus, it improves teaching effectiveness and decreases feelings of isolation. The following toolkit was designed to help all faculty navigate a successful mentoring relationship."

Toolkit

 

 

"Collectors, Nightlights, and Allies, Oh My! White Mentors in the Academy" 

“Through autoethnography rooted in Critical Race Theory counternarratives," Marisela Martinez-Cola, the author of this journal article, identifies, defines, and discusses "three roles White mentors play for students of Color.”

Citation: Martinez-Cola, M. (2020). Collectors, Nightlights, and Allies, Oh My! White Mentors in the Academy. Understanding and Dismantling Privilege, 10(1).

 

“So, you want to be an effective and inclusive mentor?”

This section of the learning space "Mentoring the next generation: Using undergraduate research to broaden engagement and impact in STEM" by Pierszalowski & Buser (2021), offers guidance on employing mentorship to diversify STEM fields by promoting undergraduate research experiences.

Citation: Pierszalowski, S. & Buser, T. (2021), Mentoring the next generation: Using undergraduate research to broaden engagement and impact in STEM. Center for Advancing Research Impacts in Society: Fellows Series.

 

"Mentoring minority graduate students: Issues and strategies for institutions, faculty, and students" 

“This [journal] article identifies the challenges that minority graduate students confront in establishing healthy mentoring relationships, and the unfortunate outcomes of when minority graduate students lack productive mentoring relationships.”

Citation: Thomas, K. M., Willis, L. A., & Davis, J. (2007). Mentoring minority graduate students: Issues and strategies for institutions, faculty, and students. Equal Opportunities International.

 

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To find more resources on mentorship and mentoring, try looking through the resources of other mentoring programs. While they may not perfectly describe the dynamics of our workplace, we can still learn from their mentorship structures, relationships, and supports. Also, try coupling general searches with terminology we use in JEDI conversations.

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